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  • Bloomfield State Bank's Alerts Site:
       alerts from the FDIC can be found at http://www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/

    Fraudulent Email Claiming to be from BSB (added 12-10-12)

    There are fraudulent emails circulating with an address of e-alerts@bloombank.com and a subject of 'Security Alert : Your Online Banking Has Been Blocked'.  An example of this email is shown below:

    From: e-bankingalerts@bloombank.com
    Subject: Security Alert : Your Online Banking Has Been Blocked
    Date: Fri, 7 Dec 2012 15:16:26 -0800

    _______________________________


    Online Banking Blocked


    Dear Valued Customer,

    Due to concerns, for the safety and integrity of the Bloomfield State Bank account we have issued this warning message.

    It has come to our attention that your Bloomfield State Bank account information needs to be updated as part of our continuing commitment to protect your account and to reduce the instance of fraud on our website. If you could please take 2-5 minutes out of your online experience and update your personal records you will not run into any future problems with the online service.

    Once you have updated your account records your Bloomfield State Bank account service will not be interrupted and will continue as normal.

    Please click here www.mybloombank.com to update your Bloomfield State Bank records.

    However, Failure to do so may result in temporary account suspension. Please understand that this is a security measure intended to help protect you and your account. We apologize for any inconvenience.

    This alert relates to your Online Banking profile, rather than a particular account. The account listed here is for verification purposes only.

    Bloomfield State Bank.
    Thank You.


    Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender
    ©All Rights Reserved.

    ________________________________

     

    By clicking the www.mybloombank.com link in the email, you are actually directed to a phishing page.  The page is designed to look very much like our normal website, but is simply a copy of the images and text prompting users to login and then share private information.  The address bar does not contain our secure certificate and/or the sites https://www.mybloombank.com or https://olb.bloombank.com which are our valid websites for Online Banking.

    These e-mails are fraudulent and were not sent by Bloomfield State Bank. Recipients should consider these e-mails as an attempt to steal money or obtain personal or confidential information from the recipient. Recipients should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information. Also, please do not click on the links provided in the fraudulent emails, as this may load malicious software onto end users' computers or attempt to compromise your secure login information.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please contact any of your local Bloomfield State Bank offices to change your username or password if necessary.

     

    Fraudulent Email Claiming to be from BSB (added 11-6-12)

    There are fraudulent emails circulating with an address of e-alerts@bloombank.com and a subject of 'Important Notice About Your Online Banking'.  An example of this email is shown below:

    From: Bloomfield State Bank <e-alerts@bloombank.com>
    To:
    Sent: Monday, November 5, 2012 5:29 PM
    Subject: Important Notice About Your Online Banking

    ________________________________

    Dear Customer,
    Due to concerns, for the safety and integrity of the Bloomfield state Bank Online we have issued this
    warning message.
    It has come to our attention that your Bloomfield state Bank information needs to be updated as part
    of our continuing commitment to protect your account for year 2012 and to reduce the instance of
    fraud on our website. If you could please take 3-5 minutes out of your online experience and update
    your personal records you will not run into any future problems with the online service.
    Once you have updated your account records your Bloomfield state Bank Online service will not be
    interrupted and will continue as normal.
    Please click here www.mybloombank.com to start the update process.
    If your account information is not updated within 24 hours then your ability to access your account
    will become restricted.
    Thank you.
    We apologize for any inconvenience.
    Bloomfield State Bank.
    ________________________________

     

    These e-mails are fraudulent and were not sent by Bloomfield State Bank. Recipients should consider these e-mails as an attempt to steal money or obtain personal or confidential information from the recipient. Recipients should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information. Also, please do not click on the links provided in the fraudulent emails, as this may load malicious software onto end users' computers or attempt to compromise your secure login information.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please contact any of your local Bloomfield State Bank offices to change your username or password if necessary.

     

    Fraudulent Email Claiming to be from BSB (added 10-31-12)

    There are fraudulent emails with an address of securityalerts@bloombank.com and a subject of 'Online Banking Security Alert' requesting users visit a link to 'update' their online account. 

    Find an example of this email below:

    These e-mails are fraudulent and were not sent by Bloomfield State Bank. Recipients should consider these e-mails as an attempt to steal money or obtain personal or confidential information from the recipient. Recipients should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information. Also, please do not click on the links provided in the fraudulent emails, as this may load malicious software onto end users' computers or attempt to compromise your secure login information.

    If you have any questions or concerns, please contact any of your local Bloomfield State Bank offices to change your username or password if necessary.

     

    Fraudulent Email Claiming to be from BSB Fraud Prevention Unit (added 09-14-12)

    There are fraudulent emails with an address of noreply@bloomfield.com and a subject of 'Security Message Alert' requesting users to download a file to 'secure' their online account. 

    Find an example of this email below:

    These e-mails are fraudulent and were not sent by Bloomfield State Bank. Recipients should consider these e-mails as an attempt to steal money or obtain personal or confidential information from the recipient. Recipients should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information. Also, please do not click on the links provided in the fraudulent emails, as this may load malicious software onto end users' computers.

    If you have any questions, please contact any of your local Bloomfield State Bank offices.

     

    Fraudulent Emails Claiming to be from FDIC (added 12-09-11)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

    The e-mails appear to be sent from various "@fdic.gov" e-mail addresses, such as "insurance@fdic.gov," "subscriptions@fdic.gov," "alert@fdic.gov," or accounts@fdic.gov.

    The e-mails have subject lines, such as: "FDIC: Your business account;" "FDIC: About your business account;" "Insurance coverage of your business account;" or something similar.

    The e-mails are addressed to "Dear Business Owner," and state, "We have important news regarding your bank." They then ask recipients to "Please click here to find details." They conclude with, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

    This e-mail and link are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should not click on the link provided.

    The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.

     

    Fraudulent Emails Claiming to be from FDIC (added 09-01-11)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of fraudulent e-mails that appear to be from the FDIC and contain an infected attachment.

    The fraudulent e-mails have addresses such as "no.reply@fdic.gov" or "notify84zma@fdic.gov" on the "From" line. The message appears, with spelling and grammatical errors, as follows:

    Subject line: "FDIC notification"

    Message body:

    "Dear customer,
    Your account ACH and WIRE transaction have been temporarily suspended for security reasons due to the expiration of your security version. To download and install the newest installations read the document(pdf) attached below.

    As soon as it is setup, you transaction abilities will be fully restored.

    Best Regards, Online Security departament, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation."

    The e-mails contain an attachment "FDIC_document.zip" that will likely release malicious software if opened. These e-mails and attachments are fraudulent and were not sent by the FDIC. Recipients should consider these e-mails an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers. Recipients should NOT open the attachment.

    Financial institutions and consumers should be aware that these fraudulent e-mails may be modified over time with other subject lines, sender names, and narratives. The FDIC does not directly contact consumers, nor does the FDIC request bank customers to install software upgrades.

     

    Fraudulent Emails Claiming to be from FDIC (added 06-03-11)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

    The e-mail appears to be sent from "alert@fdic.gov" and includes a subject line that states: "FDIC: Your business account."

    The e-mail is addressed to "Dear Business Customer" and states "We have important information about your financial institution.  Please click here to find details."  It then states, "This includes information on the acquiring bank (if applicable), how your accounts and loans are affected, and how vendors can file claims against the receivership."

    This e-mail and link are fraudulent.  Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users' computers.  Recipients should not click on the link provided.

    The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.

     

    Fraudulent Emails Claiming to be from NACHA (added 3-17-11)

    Further to its notice of February 22, 1011, NACHA – The Electronic Payments Association has received reports that individuals and/or companies continue to receive fraudulent emails that have the appearance of having been sent from NACHA. These emails vary in content and appear to be transmitted from email addresses associated with the NACHA domain (@nacha.org). Some bear the name of fictitious NACHA employees and/or departments.
     
    NACHA itself does not process nor touch the ACH transactions that flow to and from organizations and financial institutions. NACHA does not send communications to persons or organizations about individual ACH transactions that they originate or receive.

    Be aware that phishing emails frequently have attachments and/or links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not open attachments or follow Web links in unsolicited emails from unknown parties or from parties with whom you do not normally communicate, or that appear to be known but are suspicious or otherwise unusual.
      
    If malicious code is detected or suspected on a computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system.
     
    Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated.
     
    Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software application security patches are installed and current.

    Fraudulent Correspondence Claiming to be from the FDIC (added 3-11-11)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

    The e-mail appears to be sent from “accounts@fdic.gov” and includes a subject line that states: “About your business account.” 

    The e-mail is addressed to “Business Customers” and states “We have important information about insurance coverage of your business accounts.”  It then asks recipients to “Please click here to view details” and includes a hyper link to a Web site.

    The e-mail says that it is from “Alyssa Williams, FDIC Insurance.”


    This e-mail and link are fraudulent.  Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users’ computers.  Recipients should not click on the link provided.

    The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers or business account holders.  

    OPT OUT PRESCREEN  www.optoutprescreen.com (added 2-26-10)
    Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies are permitted to include your name on lists used by creditors or insurers to make firm offers of credit or insurance that are not initiated by you ("Firm Offers"). The FCRA also provides you the right to "Opt-Out", which prevents Consumer Credit Reporting Companies from providing your credit file information for Firm Offers.

    Through this website, you may request to:

    • Opt-Out from receiving Firm Offers for Five Years - (electronically through this website).
    • Opt-Out from receiving Firm Offers permanently - (mail Permanent Opt-Out Election form available through this website).
    • Opt-In and be eligible to receive Firm Offers. This option is for consumers who have previously completed an Opt-Out request - (electronically through this website).

    If you choose to Opt-Out, you will no longer be included in firm offer lists provided by these four consumer credit reporting companies.      If you are not receiving firm offers because you have previously completed a request to Opt-Out, you can request to Opt-In. In doing so, you will soon be among the many consumers who can significantly benefit from having ready access to product information on credit and insurance products that may not be available to the general public.

    Fraudulent Correspondence Claiming to be from the FDIC (added 2-15-11)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.
    The subject line of the e-mail states: “Important information for depositors of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.”  The e-mail informs recipients that “…this message was sent to you as you had indicated this e-mail address as a contact, by opening an account in your bank department.” The e-mail then states, “In order to inform you about the news concerning current business activity of the Company on a timely basis, please, look through the last important changes in current regulations of endowment insurance procedure.  Please, refer to more detailed information in the attached document.”  The e-mail says that it is from “Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Investor Relations Department.” Attached to the e-mail is Zip file named “FDIC_Document.ZIP”


    This e-mail and its attachment are fraudulent.  Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, or to load malicious software onto end users’ computers.  Recipients should not open the attachment provided.

    The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers.  

     

    Fraudulent Correspondence Claiming to be from the FDIC (added 1-12-11)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports from consumers who received an e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC. The e-mail informs the recipient that "in cooperation with the Department of Homeland Security, federal, state and local governments…" the FDIC has withdrawn deposit insurance from the recipient's account "due to account activity that violates the Patriot Act." It further states deposit insurance will remain suspended until identity and account information can be verified using a system called "IDVerify." If consumers go to the link provided in the e-mail, it is suspected they will be asked for personal or confidential information, or malicious software may be loaded onto the recipient's computer.

    This e-mail is fraudulent. It was not sent by the FDIC. It is an attempt to obtain personal information from consumers. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mail and should NOT under any circumstances provide any personal information through this media.

    The FDIC is attempting to identify the source of the e-mails and disrupt the transmission. Until this is achieved, consumers are asked to report any similar attempts to obtain this information to the FDIC by sending information to alert@fdic.gov.

    For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's Web site at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2011/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.

     

    Fraudulent Correspondence Claiming to be from the FDIC (added 12-4-09)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is reminding financial institutions, businesses and consumers that fraudulent correspondence claiming to be from the FDIC continues to be mailed, faxed and e-mailed in the United States and other countries. The correspondence uses various techniques to gain the trust of recipients in hopes they will provide sensitive personal information, including bank account numbers, that can be used to steal money and other assets. Recipients should NOT, under any circumstances, respond to the fraudulent requests. Institutions also are encouraged to inform customers that fraud artists may use the names of the FDIC and other government agencies and to take appropriate precautions.

    The criminals, knowing that people trust the FDIC name, have duplicated the official logo and seal in fraudulent letters, forms, certificates and other correspondence. Recent examples have included invoices, bills, transfer forms, guarantees, endorsements, and confirmations of stock and investment purchases. In some cases, recipients were asked to complete fraudulent forms and return them by fax or e-mail. In other cases, recipients were asked to remit funds via check or wire transfer service.

    The FDIC rarely sends unsolicited bills or other similar documents to financial institutions, businesses and consumers. In particular, the FDIC does not send unsolicited correspondence asking for sensitive personal information, including bank account information. Anyone receiving such correspondence should contact the FDIC immediately by calling toll-free at 1-877-ASK-FDIC (1-877-275-3342) or by e-mailing to alert@fdic.gov. Do not use contact information listed for the FDIC in the correspondence because it is likely to be falsified.

     

    Fraudulent Work-at-Home Funds Transfer Agent Schemes (added 10-30-09)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is warning financial institutions of an increase in schemes to recruit individuals to receive and transmit unauthorized electronic funds transfers (EFTs) from deposit accounts to individuals overseas. These funds transfer agents, often referred to as "money mules," are typically solicited on the Internet by criminals who have gained unauthorized access to the online deposit account of a business or consumer. In a typical scenario, the criminal will originate unauthorized EFTs from a victim's account to a money mule's deposit account. The money mule is then instructed to quickly withdraw the funds and wire them overseas after deducting a "commission" (commonly eight to ten percent).

    Criminals target online deposit accounts at institutions where business customers can originate EFTs, such as automated clearing house (ACH) and wire transfers, over the Internet. Money mules, however, can be customers at any depository institution where EFTs can be received and funds withdrawn. In some cases, the money mule may be an unknowing accomplice in a fraud scheme. Because EFTs are often made immediately available by the receiving institution, funds may be removed and wire transferred overseas before the fraud is detected.

    Money mule schemes can take many different forms, but most involve receiving unauthorized EFTs into a deposit account and then withdrawing the funds or forwarding them on to another party via another EFT. The following are common scenarios:

    • Online job posting Web sites are used by criminals to locate individuals seeking employment with flexible work hours that can be performed from home. These work-at-home schemes often involve written employment contracts, job descriptions and procedures to legitimize the scam.

    • Advance fee scams promising large monetary rewards for acting as a financial intermediary can entice individuals to participate in this activity.

    • Mystery shopping jobs may be used that require the employee to assess the performance of money service businesses by completing EFTs and then evaluating the service using customer satisfaction forms.

    • Social networking sites may be used to recruit individuals to act as money mules. Criminals conjure up various imaginative stories to befriend and persuade individuals to receive and forward stolen funds.

    • Some hesitant or skeptical money mules have been intimidated, harassed and threatened by their criminal "employers" to process the funds transfers quickly and with secrecy.

    • The personal identifiable information provided by the money mule might later be used to commit identity theft or account takeover.

     

    FDIC Consumer Alert (added 10-27-09)
    October 26, 2009
     
    IBA Logo IBA Consumer Alert
     
     
     
     
     
    FDIC Consumer Alert - Oct.26, 2009
     
        The Indiana Bankers Association has received notice that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.
        The subject line of the e-mail states: "check your Bank Deposit Insurance Coverage." The e-mail tells recipients that, "You have received this message because you are a holder of a FDIC-insured bank account. Recently FDIC has officially named the bank you have opened your account with as a failed bank, thus, taking control of its assets."
        The e-mail then asks recipients to "visit the official FDIC website and perform the following steps to check your Deposit Insurance Coverage" (a fraudulent link is provided). It then instructs recipients to "download and open your personal FDIC Insurance File to check your Deposit Insurance Coverage."
        This e-mail and associated website are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, some of which may be used to gain unauthorized access to online banking services or to conduct identity theft.
        The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT follow the link in the fraudulent e-mail. 
     
    6925 Parkdale Place * Indianapolis, IN 46254-4673 * 317-387-9380 * Fax: 317-387-9374
    www.indianabankers.org 
    Official Release from FDIC

    Fraudulent Visa/Mastercard calls to Consumers (added 2-23-09)

    Fraudulent caller from Visa or MasterCard calls a consumer and informs the consumer they are calling to check up on an "unusual purchase" on their card.  They continue and tell what the supposed "unusual purchase" is and the amount, usually just under $500.  When you answer no that isn't a valid charge, they then say they will be issuing a credit back to your account in this amount, but before they can process this, they must have some numbers from the back of your card to verify you are the actual accountholder and possess the card.  When/if you give this information to them they will tell you it is correct and then they will instead of crediting you, charge your account.  They never ask for your credit card number during the phone call and sound very professional and give reference and control number.

    NEVER give out numbers on the back of your card unless you initiated the call and know who you are speaking with.  Visa/MasterCard will never ask you for information from the card as they have all of the information on file.
     

    Fraudulent Attempts to Obtain Bank Information from Small Businesses (added 2-19-09)

    Article sent by US Small Business Administration   Link to article
     

    Fraudulent Compliance Requests to Hoosier Businesses (added 2-11-09)

    Article sent by Indiana Secretary of State   Link to article
     

    Recent Phishing Attacks in area (added 8-4-08)

    Article sent by Indiana Bankers association.   PDF Article of Full News release

    Member institutions of the Indiana Bankers Association (IBA) have reported recent scams in Indiana:
    • A phone scam states in a recorded message that said the caller is with a local Indiana bank and claims that the consumer’s debit card had been suspended. The fraudulent caller then recites a phone number to call, allegedly to reactivate the card.

    • A website scam originating in Canada copies bank websites and distributes mass e-mails. The e-mails claim that consumers who complete an online “bank” survey will receive $90 deposited into their accounts.

    Consumers are advised to be alert and aware, and are invited to contact their trusted personal/business bankers for guidance.
     

    Fraudulent e-mails from FDIC (added 3-18-08)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous notifications from consumers of an e-mail that gives the appearance of being sent from the FDIC. The "From" line of the e-mail displays the name "Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation <consumer@fdic.gov>" and the subject includes the words "Consumer Protection."

    Current versions of the fraudulent e-mail state:

    "Who is FDIC?

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) preserves and promotes public confidence in the U.S. financial system by insuring deposits in banks.

    What can FDIC do for you?

    Despite the efforts of law enforcement, Identity theft is becoming more sophisticated and the number of new victims is growing. In general, consumers are protected against liability for unauthorized accounts or transactions under federal and state law and by financial industry practices. Identity Theft can affect consumers in many ways, thats [sic] why FDIC is presenting a new card insurance which can restore you up to $500 if you are a victim of internet fraud. Learn more about Consumer Protection > Card Insurance: Clicking here will redirect you to a online signup page for this program."

    The e-mail requests that recipients click on a hyperlink that is provided. This directs the recipient to a "spoofed" Web page requesting the user to enter personal information to receive $500 of "card insurance." The requested information (name, phone number, Social Security number, address, card number, bank name, card expiration date, card verification code, and electronic signature/ATM PIN) could be used to perpetrate identity theft and gain unauthorized

    access to bank accounts. Be aware that the appearance of the fraudulent e-mails can be modified and that additional variations are possible.

    Consumers should NOT access the link provided within the body of the e-mail and should NOT, under any circumstances, provide any personal financial information through this media.

    The FDIC has shut down the fraudulent Web site and is investigating the source of the e-mails. Consumers are asked to report any similar attempts to obtain this information to the FDIC by sending information to alert@fdic.gov.

    Information about counterfeit items, cyber-fraud incidents and other fraudulent activity may be forwarded to the FDIC’s Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section, 550 17th Street, N.W., Room F-4004, Washington, D.C. 20429, or transmitted electronically to alert@fdic.gov. Questions related to federal deposit insurance or consumer issues should be submitted to the FDIC using an online form that can be accessed at http://www2.fdic.gov/starsmail/index.asp.

    For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC’s Web site at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2008/index.html. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html.

    Sandra L. Thompson

    Director

    Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection

    Advance Fee Loan Scams (added 3-18-08)

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is reminding consumers and financial institutions to be aware of advance fee loan scams. The FDIC has observed a significant increase in the number of unsolicited e-mails ("spam") advertising mortgage refinancing, debt consolidation and elimination, small business loans, and special loan programs for veterans and minorities. While some of these e-mails may advertise legitimate loan programs and lenders, advance fee loan scams are becoming more prevalent.

    Advance fee loan scams prey on consumers who may be under financial duress and may be seeking quick and easy loan approval and funding. The scam typically involves the lender making false promises to arrange for a loan in return for fees paid upfront by the loan applicant. Scam artists may even design Web sites and online loan applications giving the appearance that the company is legitimate.

    Fraudulent logos and letterhead of legitimate financial institutions or government agencies may also appear on documents that are faxed to the loan applicant. Potential borrowers may be asked to provide information through a Web site or be contacted by phone or e-mail by a "representative" who guarantees loan approval as soon as the borrower pays a required fee. The loan applicant may be told that the fees will be used to pay a third party for loan insurance or application processing, or to make the first month's loan payment. The loan applicant may also be told to send or wire transfer money to an individual overseas before receiving the loan proceeds.

    In some cases, the loan applicant has been falsely directed to a legitimate financial institution with no knowledge of the transaction. In other cases, the loan applicant is told that the loan request was declined and is asked to forward additional money to qualify for a different loan program.

    The following are warning signs that may indicate a loan offer is not legitimate:

    * The loan approval is "guaranteed." Lenders do not typically guarantee loans before analyzing the applicant's financial condition, credit history and ability to repay.

    * The loan applicant is required to pay upfront fees to a third party or individual. Loan fees are normally paid to a business after the loan has been approved.

    * The lender or loan processor may be located outside of the United States.

    * Fees are requested using a retail wire transfer system. A password is sometimes used by the overseas receiver to pick up the funds in an attempt to hide the true identity of the criminals and make funds more difficult to trace.

    Victims of online advance loan fee scams should report the crimes to the Internet Crime Complaint Center at http://www.ic3.gov/. More information about fraudulent advance loan fee scams can be found at http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/pubs/tmarkg/loans.shtm.

    For your reference, FDIC Special Alerts may be accessed from the FDIC's Web site at www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2008/index.html<http://www.fdic.gov/news/news/SpecialAlert/2008/index.html>. To learn how to automatically receive FDIC Special Alerts through e-mail, please visit www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html<http://www.fdic.gov/about/subscriptions/index.html>.

    Sandra L. Thompson

    Director

    Division of Supervision and Consumer Protection

     

    Free Annual Consumer Credit Report (added 3-3-08)

    The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide consumer reporting companies – Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion – to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months. The FCRA promotes the accuracy and privacy of information in the files of the nation’s consumer reporting companies. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the FCRA with respect to consumer reporting companies.

    A credit report includes information on where you live, how you pay your bills, and whether you’ve been sued, arrested, or filed for bankruptcy. Nationwide consumer reporting companies sell the information in your report to creditors, insurers, employers, and other businesses that use it to evaluate your applications for credit, insurance, employment, or renting a home.

    The three nationwide consumer reporting companies have set up a central website, a toll-free telephone number, and a mailing address through which you can order your free annual report.

    To order, visit http://www.annualcreditreport.com or call 1-877-322-8228.

     

    For older Alerts please visit our archives.

         
     
     


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    Bloomfield State Bank
    48 N. Washington
    Bloomfield, IN  47424